Proprioceptive drift visulaisation


My experiments show a strong ‘drift’ in ‘proprioception’ as the experiment progresses, this is the Sense which allows us to be able to know where our body or parts of it are. I asked people to locate the position of their index finger under a platform after embodying a clay object. And also draw their hand blind afterwards.

The experiment shows how reactive and plastic this internal sense of body position and shape is.

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Spontaneous sensations

Here are the outcomes from a simple experiment, superimposed from 8 participants. The experiment is described in the paper “the tickly homunculus and the origins of spontaneous sensations arising on the hands”  in which you focus on your hand while staring at it (convergent focusing) or divergent focusing (staring at red marker next to the hand you are focussing on) for just 10 seconds and report the sensations…

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In this experiment, many of the bemused participants described a tingling where the hand made contact with the table. They were bemused because I did this experiment in the context of our methods and methodologies discussion group – where I was attempting to present my project. I thought it would be interesting to experience, ‘first hand’ the type of phenomenological experiments I’m looking at, and ‘practising’…

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21190869

Strange face illusion with two-way Mirror feedback

 

A version of the Strange Face illusion with video feedback and face tracking through a two-way mirror

“… a quiet room dimly lit by a 25 W incandescent light. The lamp was placed on the floor behind the observer so that it was not visible either directly or in the mirror. A relatively large mirror (0.5 m60.5 m) was placed about 0.4 m in front of the observer. The luminance of the reflected face image within the mirror was about 0.2 cd mÿ2 and this level allowed detailed perception of fine face traits but attenuated colour perception…The task of the observer was to gaze at his/her reflected face within the mirror. Usually, after less than a minute, the observer began to perceive the strange-face illusion…”  Giovanni B Caputo, Perception, 2010, volume 39, pages 1007 – 1008 2010

 

On the embodiment of unfeasible objects

Further to my last post detailing experiments relating embodiment of invisible and even third hands, here are some notes on my first ‘Clay hand Illusion’ experiments…

The ‘Rubber hand illusion’ shows it is possible to convince participants that a rubber hand is their own by placing it in front of them while stroking it in the same way as their hidden real hand. The use of self-made clay hands, or objects [see below] in place of the rubber hand raises several interesting possibilities for exploration, which move away from the embodiment of replica body parts, and towards the possible embodiment of modified body parts, or completely ‘unfeasible’ objects.tactile_object3.jpgThe clay allows for the gradual and immediate morphing of forms and for the participant to build a sensory connection with the object through its creation. As an artist [who has worked with clay] I feel a sense of deep connection with the objects I make, especially during making them. For example, I feel my face move and contort when I am trying to draw a face. I wonder if this is true of others? This is why for my first participants I am choosing those who work with clay.

In regard to the embodiment of ‘unfeasible’ objects, the possibility of such a thing has been loosely disproven in several studies [See ‘The Invisible Hand Illusion’]. Whereby a plank of wood and a spoon were substituted in place of the embodied hand. Therefore I am keen to explore this further. So far I have had encouraging results which build on the results from the first workshop session [See image below]. Is it easier to achieve a connection with self-made objects, rather than an irrelevant object, such as the plank of wood?
hands03In my first ‘beta’ study, I worked with a participant who is a maker and uses clay in their work. After making a good connection with their self-made clay hand, I asked if they could make a non-hand like an object, or a modification to the clay hand, for a further experiment. They immediately opted to make a roundish blob. Followed by a further iteration; a doughnut shape. They were able to make a strong feeling of connection with the blob and the Doughnut, though not as strong as to the hand, and the connection took longer to achieve. The connection was patchy, in parts, and mapped over the surface.

I found that the fingers could be mapped around the object by using a combination of synchronous tapping and swapping over the embodied finger with other digits, and the moving the already embodied finger over to a new location on the object. For example, the index finger feels fully connected to the clay object but, the ring finger does not. So I tap on the real ring finger and say I’m tapping on the index finger. They then seem to believe that this finger is now connected, when I return to the index finger – they now believe the finger next to the index finger is now newly connected to the clay. It’s not easy to explain! More on this later. The main part of the hand did not feel fully embodied.

It seemed like that with time, and combinations of synchronous and non-synchronous tapping, the hand could be mapped in two dimensions over the surface of the object.

I also found an interesting ‘compression’ in the perceived length of the fingers! When I tapped on the knuckle where the finger joins the hand, the participant thought this was the middle of their finger.

Working with the clay has an interesting effect of leaving traces of the tapping and stroking process so over time a textural surface is built up. When experimenting with the clay blob the participant made the following comment…

IMG_1640Unfeasible Object #1 Participant 1

 “I fully believe that’s my hand, but like there’s an obstacle, like you cant push past it…it feels like my hand is made out of this clay, but there is only so far you can push into it…it feels like a barrier”

The barrier seemed to be just under the surface of the clay. Perhaps this suggests a  surface-deep sensation of the perceived embodiment? Another interesting comment…

“Its like when I’m making something, I can feel my hand moulding something, and it feels like I’m on the opposite side of that”

The significance of this comment hit home when my supervisor picked up on the idea of ‘actions’ ie how we might hold an object, or how the object was made. Could embodiment of these objects be stronger if I considered them from the point of view of how they might be handled? This makes me think of ways in which the underside of the hand could be used in the illusion, rather than the back of the hand as is traditionally used. An upside down or inside out version of the Rubber hand Illusion? My experiment continues to evolve…

Blind drawing of hand

Blind drawing of hand starting from the left and using a continuous line, before and after experiments.
before-afterCould this exercise be used as a measure of “proprioceptive drift” before and after ‘Rubber hand illusion’ type experiments? I will be exploring this idea soon with the research group at BEAM lab…

Clay hand drawings

Here are are a selection of drawn outlines of clay hands created by workshop participants aged 6 to 12 for the original clay hand experiment (see posts tagged rubber hand or clay hand) Participants of all ages were asked to create a hand and use it in place of a replica rubber hand, the idea was to test if a self-created hand was easier to connect with. The hands were then taken and worked on further, sometimes becoming more distorted and abstract.
hands03.jpg

Drawing a strange face in the dark

Shortly after my experience of the “Strange face in the mirror experiment”  I made these drawings in low light conditions as a way of recording the perceivable elements of my face and shape of the head. The particles of carbon and graphite reflect well the visual noise, like static, one experiences in the experiment. These drawings don’t illustrate the hallucinations I experienced [these will follow]

“staring at one’s own reflection in a mirror in a darkened room for some time can induce vivid hallucinations. For purposes of research, I had to try it”  My experience of the ‘strange face illusion’…

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Drawing in near darkness
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Drawing in near darkness


For my description of my experience of the ‘strange face’, illusion see here… “staring at one’s own reflection in a mirror in a darkened room for some time can induce vivid hallucinations. For purposes of research, I had to try it” 
My experience of the ‘strange face illusion’…